Category Archives: CEO Pay

Obama to cap executive pay for those who receive public funds

Responding to outrage over reports of Wall Street excess, President Obama announced plans to cap executive compensation at $500,000 for those firms that accept significant federal assistance moving forward. Well, not surprisingly, a number of interested parties immediately began to point out that capping salaries on Wall Street is a mistake. For example, Heidi Przybyla and Christopher Stern of Bloomberg report:

Efforts to curb executive pay may backfire, said Scott Minerd, chief executive officer and chief investment officer of Guggenheim Partners Asset Management, who helps oversee more than $30 billion in stocks and bonds.

The Obama measure is “too draconian and too arbitrary, and doesn’t take into account free-market forces,” said Minerd. “Companies that need the most talented people to fix their problems won’t be able to pay them.”

Many white collar workers have bonuses – to a greater or lesser degree – as a part of their compensation package. Most of these same workers understand that if the organization isn’t successful then your bonus is negatively impacted. Hell, it is safe to say that many white collar employees did not receive bonuses this year due to the economic downturn.

So it is no surprise that the typical non-Wall Street white collar worker would be appalled that employees of “unsuccessful” Wall Street firms would receive nearly $18 billion in bonuses (6th highest total in Wall Street history), when nearly every firm received tax payer funds.

When your firm is on life support and is receiving public funds due in large part to your executive teams greed and very poor decision making, then the argument that limiting pay will cause brain drain rings hollow. It is difficult to believe that the firm has the best and the brightest who are deserving of extraordinary pay when the firm is in a ditch. In fact, those responsible for the firms decisions should be thankful to have a job because based on their performance they should be unemployed.

Ultimately the decision is simple. If your firm is confident in your team of rain makers that clearly is worth millions and can not live with pay caps, then don’t accept the funds and make them earn their pay. Use their extraordinary talents to pull the firm out of the ditch. We wish you luck and great success. However, if you need public funds in order to survive, then you need to tighten your belt and figure out how you will survive on $500,000 until your firm can pay back the public funds.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under CEO Pay, Executive Excess, Executive Pay, Financial Services, Wall Street

Does short-term management pay?

Natalie Mizik and Robert Jacobson wrote an article entitled, The cost of myopic management for the July/August edition of the Harvard Business Review in which they explored the costs paid by the organization (and ultimately investors) when they become too focused on short-term revenue targets and begin inflating their earning by cutting expenditures. During their study executives would cut discretionary spending, which often included R&D, in favor of more impressive looking earnings. Mizik & Jacobson tracked over 400 companies and found that those firms that practiced “myopic management” would often have very impressive returns in the short-term, but long-term performed miserably. In order to begin to correct this behavior, firms need to begin to penalize executives for losses, not just reward them for gains. In addition, a portion of their compensation package should be tied to tenure, long-term growth and brand strength. Once an executive’s compensation is tied to long-term goals and objectives the myopic behavior will change as well.

short-term.png

5 Comments

Filed under CEO, CEO Pay, CEO Salary, Executive Pay, Harvard Business Review, Leadership, Management, Natalie Mizik, Robert Jacobson

CEO Pay

I read an article on PC World about the rumored layoffs by IBM – the rumors are reportedly bogus – and I began to reflect on the Douglas Mattern article entitled, CEO Pay is Outrageous and It’s Undemocratic.  In particular, the following quote really stuck with me.

Business Week reports that the disparity between the ‘shop floor and the executive suite’ is at an all-time high. In 1980, CEOs made 42 times the average blue-collar worker. By 1990, this disparity rose to 85 times, and by the year 2000 the disparity between worker and CEO climbed to 531 times as much.

This trend is particularly bothersome because while it may motivate those employees who are striving to become CEOs, it mostly de-motivates blue collar and other lower paid employees – those that are most susceptible to layoffs.  While the CEOs role is critical and is a very stressful position, in general they are being disproportionately compensated – often with little or no direct ties to the performance of the company.  For example, Bob Nardelli when he accepted the position at Home Depot refused to have his compensation tied to the stock price of the organization.  Over his six year tenure, he made many moves to make the organization “lean and mean” which both drained morale at this once proud organization and had negative impacts on customer service.

While some organizations are cracking down on CEO pay packages, most still provide lucrative “golden parachutes” to CEOs.  The CEO severance package, which are often for multiple millions of dollars, include additional benefits on top of the enormous compensation packages that they received during their tenure with the company.  What’s maddening is that these packages are paid out after the organization decides that, based on a lack of performance; they need to replace the CEO.  Employees will see the total pay packages of the CEO and also witness hundreds, if not thousands, of their fellow employees get laid off due to budget cuts and restructuring and it is not hard to understand why they would lack motivation.

So while the IBM story may not be accurate, it is nevertheless tough to watch as employees get laid off due to ineffective, grossly overpaid executives.

Leave a comment

Filed under Bob Nardelli, CEO, CEO Pay, CEO Salary, Douglas mattern, Executive Excess, Executive Pay, Golden parachute, Home Depot, IBM, PC World